Venue: Old City Jail, Charleston, SC
Type of Event: Wedding
Wedding Planner: Kristin Newman Design (KND)
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KND Wedding Reception

Saturday, May 26, 2012

PASSED HORS D’OEUVRES

Stuffed Cream Cheese, Roasted Shallots, Topped with Green Tomato Marmalade

Collard Green Wonton

(SERVED ON TAPAS OVAL BOWL)

Southern Fried Chicken and Waffles

with a Maple Apple Smoked Bacon Rémoulade

(SERVED IN BROWN SUGAR)

STATIONS

Charleston She Crab

with Aged Sherry in a Demitasse Cup

Boiled Peanut Hummus

with Red Pepper Jam on a Crispy Flatbread

Garnished with Micro Greens

(TWO STATIONS WITH BOTH – INSIDE)

Cru’s Famous Four Cheese Macaroni

with Brunoise Scallop Garnish Served in a Scallop Shell

(ONE STATION INSIDE)

and

(OUTSIDE ON A LONG CONTINUOUS STATION)

(OUTSIDE – TWO STATIONS)

FRIED GREEN TOMATO CHEF STATION

Fried Green Tomato Napoleon

Pimento Cheese, Basil

Bed of Arugula with an Aged Balsamic Reduction

(OUTSIDE – TWO STATIONS)

ENTREE CHEF STATION

Pan Roasted Duck Breast

with Julienne Squash, Shrimp Chip

and Plum Wine Demi

(OUTSIDE – TWO STATIONS)

CREOLE SHRIMP AND GRITS CHEF STATION

Shrimp, Smoked Chicken and Crawfish Jambalaya

Four Cheese Grits and Fried Okra Hushpuppy

BAR SERVICE

Premium Bar

Includes Sodas and Mixers plus 2 Domestic Beers, 2 Imported Beers and Red and White Wine

Beer Selections: Blue Moon, Fat Tire, Palm Amber, Bud Light

Smirnoff Vodka – Bombay Sapphire Gin- Captain Morgan’s Rum – Bacardi Rum

Liquor selections:

Makers Mark Bourbon – Johnny Walker Red Scotch

SPECIALTY JAIL CELL DRINKS

Champagne and Sparkling Water

(WILL BE SET UP AT ENTRANCE FOR 5:30 GUEST ARRIVAL)

Signature Cocktail : Lemongrass Heat

Jalapeño Infused Vodka, Lemongrass, Lime Juice, Agave Nectar

or

Signature Cocktail: Bourbon Smash

Fresh Peach, Lemon, Bourbon, Peach Bitters, Ginger Beer

(WILL BE SET UP AT ENTRANCE FOR 7:00 GUEST ARRIVAL)

Signature Cocktail: Hendricks Gin Martini with Pickled Shallot and Olive

(MARTINI BAR ON 3RD FLOOR)

About the Old City Jail

Tucked away in the heart of historic Charleston, the Old City Jail stands as a haunting reminder of the city’s darkest past. The jail, which was operational from 1802 until 1939, housed Charleston’s most infamous criminals, 19th-century pirates and Civil War prisoners.[2] The Old Jail building served as the Charleston County Jail from its construction in 1802 until 1939. In 1680, as the city of Charleston was being laid out, a four-acre square of land was set aside at this location for public use. In time a hospital, poor house, workhouse for runaway slaves, and this jail were built on the square. When the Jail was constructed in 1802 it consisted of four stories, topped with a two-story octagonal tower. Charleston architects Barbot & Seyle were responsible for 1855 alterations to the building, including a rear octagonal wing, expansions to the main building and the Romanesque Revival details. This octagonal wing replaced a fireproof wing with individual cells, designed by Robert Mills in 1822, five years earlier than his notable Fireproof Building. The 1886 earthquake badly damaged the tower and top story of the main building, and these were subsequently removed.[3] The Old Jail housed a great variety of inmates. John and Lavinia Fisher, and other members of their gang, convicted of robbery and murder in the Charleston Neck region were imprisoned here in 1819 to 1820. Some of the last 19th-century high-sea pirates were jailed here in 1822 while they awaited hanging. The jail was active after the discovery of Denmark Vesey’s planned slave revolt. In addition to several hundreds of free blacks and slaves jailed for their involvement, four white men convicted of supporting the 1822 plot were imprisoned here. Vesey spent his last days in the tower before being hanged. Increased restrictions were placed on slaves and free blacks in Charleston as a result of the Vesey plot, and law required that all black seaman be kept here while they were in port. During the Civil War, Confederate and Federal prisoners of war were incarcerated here. It is one of more than 1400 historically significant buildings within the Charleston Old and Historic District.

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